Analysis of Holy Thursday by William Blake.

The “Holy Thursday” of Innocence was open to two contrasting readings. This version is blunt and may only be read as a harsh critique of the religious hypocrisy inherent in the institutions of Blake’s day.

However, there is also a poem called Holy Thursday in William Blake’s Songs of Experience, which differs from the one in Songs of Innocence. Songs of Innocence consists of 19 poems that portray happy pastoral images and the vulnerability in this innocent perception. Holy Thursday depicts a particular ceremony, which takes place in England.

A Literary Analysis of Holy Thursday - Songs of Innocence.

In the poem “Holy Thursday” from Songs of Innocence, Blake described the public appearance of charity school children in St. Paul’s Cathedral on Ascension Day. In this “experienced” version, however, he critiques rather than praises the charity of the institutions responsible for hapless children.In the companion poem of Holy Thursday Songs of Innocence, William Blake discusses in the Songs of Experience the social chaos, especially the treatment of poor children, at that time.The poem Holy Thursday (from The Songs of Innocence) describes the ceremonies happening on this day. The orphans are exhibited before the public for extracting money from them.


In both Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience, the poem titled “Holy Thursday” occurs on Holy Thursday. This was a special service at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, which was held on the first Thursday in May.In Songs of Innocence and of Experience Blake shows that human life is at its best when it has a healthy relationship with nature, when it is part of it and not superior to it. In many ways the poems seek to remove the anthropocentric view that humans have. Blake seems to suggest that nature should be afforded the same rights as human beings.

English Romantic Verse Revision. This is still a relatively new course, with the first examinations having taken place in June 2017. You will have to pick one of two specified questions, each of which will have one poem that is part of this collection, and then it is up to you to compare another poem from those that you have studied to also write about within the same essay.

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This poem was first published in 1794 and was one of the series of poems in Songs of Experience. These short poems explore the harsh realities of late 18th and early 19th Century life during the.

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An essay for the course in British Literature of the Romantic period that I had to write.

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The Songs of Innocence and Experience deal with different types of love. Explore two sorts of relationship either by comparing a pair of poems or by ranging across the whole collection. Compare and contrast The Divine Image and The Human Abstract.

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In general, Holy Thursday is meant to be a joyous occasion as Blake writes about the children in Songs of innocence but the exploitation by the powerful minority has demoralised the poor majority and this foul mood on such an occasion is shown in Holy Thursday from Songs of Experience.

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Songs of Innocence and of Experience William Blake. The following entry presents criticism of Blake's poetry collection, Songs of Innocence and of Experience: Shewing the Two Contrary States of.

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HOLY THURSDAY ’Twas on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean, Came children walking two and two, in read, and blue, and green: Grey-headed beadles walked before, with wands as white as snow, Till into the high dome of Paul’s they like Thames waters flow. Oh what a multitude they seemed, these flowers of London town!

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The companion poems in Songs of Innocence and of Experience establish a distance between the dissimilar states of pure innocence and world-worn experience. Blake’s illuminated poems, “Introduction” to both Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience, feature a speaker whose inspirations, themes and tones highlight the dichotomy between the soul’s states of both innocence and experience.

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William Blake’s collection of illuminated poems in Songs of Innocence and of Experience depict, as the title page explains, “the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul” (Blake 1). Although Songs of Innocence, written in 1789, was crafted five years prior to Songs of Experience both collections read as stand alone works of engraving art and poetry; however, the second work was created to.

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Holy Thursday I is one of the poems that Blake wrote in his book called Songs of Innocence in 1789. The poem describes a ceremony called Ascension Day in England and the presence of children in a cathedral to celebrate and do their singing activities.

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